Sarbanes-Oxley: Managing Information In Its' Shadow

Many financial firms manage their information with an overly keen eye towards the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The actual requirements of Sarbanes-Oxley (Sarbox) for information management are not very specific but have far-reaching consequences. These consequences, however, should not scare a financial firm into inaction.

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LTFS 3: Linear Tape File System and the Future of Tape Data Storage

The Linear Tape File System (LTFS) is an open specification that is taking tape management into the future. With LTFS, which boasts the convenience of USB and external storage options and generally larger capacities, tape has regained its rightful place among other data storage technologies. LTFS enables organizations to push the boundaries of magnetic tape storage with both traditional and nontraditional uses. As an open specification, LTFS can be utilized by any company's LTFS software since it is vendor-neutral, and data stored on tape using LTFS is self-contained and self-referential: Much like a USB or external drive, the tape includes an index with drag-and-drop functionality but with larger storage potential.

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LTFS 2: The Linear Tape File System - The Evolution and Revolution of Tape

The Linear Tape File System (LTFS) is the latest development in magnetic tape, a technology that has been evolving for over 50 years and remains one of the most efficient means of storing data and information. The Linear Tape File System is self-contained tape that stores data and information and makes it accessible on any operating system (OS).

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LTFS 1: Linear Tape File System - The Brilliant Breakthrough

The Linear Tape File System (LTFS) is one of the most important breakthroughs in magnetic tape storage. LTFS is a fully encompassed file system that writes the file structure, files and metadata onto a self-contained magnetic tape. Previously, magnetic tape stored only the actual file, but file structure, metadata etc. were stored separately, which meant that tape had additional requirements for retrieval. Since the new LTFS technology is self-referential, it can be utilized without further information being "fed" into the stream of data from the tape. This new technology makes tape management much easier by making the file structure as familiar as an external hard drive with the limitless storage potential that tape can provide. Michael Richmond, the lead architect of this new technology, discussed the creation of LTFS with Jay Livens of Iron Mountain in a recent podcast.

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